Advice / Links

Bravecto

We started carrying an oral flea and tick preventative that last 3 months. To generate some interest, we are offering 10% off Bravecto and Iverheart/Heartguard/Proheart (you only have to get one of the heartworm preventatives) when they are purchased together. This offer is valid through the end of October. ***Bravecto is a prescription medication, so your pet does need to be current on an exam to purchase.

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North Fork Veterinary Clinic: Auburn Journal Best of the Best

We want to thank all of our amazing clients for voting North Fork Vet and Dr. Sheriff Auburn’s Best of the Best! We are grateful for your continued love and support. Without you, the last 30 years would not have been possible!

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Did you know?
We Can Now Treat Your Exotic Animals

Our newest Doctor, Dr. Jennifer Curtis is well trained and experienced in treating all sorts of exotic animals.

Including:
Chickens (Laying Hens & Roosters)
Birds
Rabbits
Guinea Pigs
Hamsters
Ferrets
Rats
Reptiles

Hot Weather Tips For Your Pet

Summertime is a time for fun and frolicking but it’s also fraught with danger for our pets. When the temperature rises, we need to take extra caution to make sure our pets are okay in the heat. Here are some key tips to help keep your pet cool and safe.

DON’T LEAVE YOUR PET ALONE IN THE CAR ON A WARM DAY

Despite the warnings, every year, pets die after their owners leave them in a parked car that overheats. Within just a few minutes, a car can get extremely shot, stifling, and deadly.Dr. Ernie Ward did an experiment on a warm summer’s day in which he sat in a parked car with the windows cracked. He wanted to see just how hot it would get. Within 30 minutes it was 117 degrees inside the car. “Never, ever leave your dog in a parked car on a warm day,” he pleads at the end of the video he made to document his experience. That goes for any pet, by the way!

BE VIGILANT ABOUT VET CARE

When it starts getting warm outside, take your dog or cat to the vet for a full check up. The check up should include a heartworm test and a flea and tick protection plan. These are year-round issues but in the summer months, with much more outdoors time, it’s especially important to monitor them.

AVOID WALKING YOUR DOG IN THE HEAT

Aim for mornings and evenings when letting your dog outside, cautions Dr. Marty Becker in his article, “Beat the Heat Tips for Your Dog.” Sometimes, though, it’s just hot all day long and Dr. Becker says, “Even in the coolest part of the day, watch for signs of trouble: Glassy eyes and frantic panting indicate a dog who needs help. Get to a veterinarian immediately if you see these symptoms!”

KEEP YOUR HOME COOL FOR YOUR PETS

When the temperature outside gets hot, it can be harder to keep the indoors cool. Some people turn their air conditioning off when they leave for the day. If you have a pet at home, this could put him in danger. A Vetstreet.com article, “Summer Hazards and Your Dog,” advises: “Instead of turning off the air conditioner, try leaving it on a conservative but comfortable setting (perhaps 76°F) while you are out.” The article recommends you make sure your pet has water and, “consider closing curtains to reduce the heating effects of sunlight through the windows.”

GIVE YOUR PETS ACCESS TO SHADE AND PLENTY OF WATER 

Pets can get dehydrated or get heatstroke quickly so any pet outside needs to have plenty of water and access to shade.

KNOW WHICH DOGS ARE LESS TOLERANT OF HEAT

Dr. Becker reminds us that some dog breeds are less tolerant of the heat than others. “Remember that older, obese or short-nosed dogs (Pugs, Bulldogs, Boston Terriers, Pekingese, Boxers, Shih Tzu’s and French Bulldogs) are less tolerant of heat.”  Also, older dogs, puppies and dogs with health issues can also be more susceptible to hot weather. Of course, you should keep a close eye on your dog in the heat, no matter what his breed, age or state of health.

Our pets rely on us to protect them and keep them comfortable and safe year round! Remember, if you’re hot, your pets are definitely hot.

https://www.petfinder.com/dogs/dog-care/hot-weather-tips/

Rattlesnake vaccine for dogs

Rattlesnakes live in a variety of habitats.

They are found in wetlands, deserts and forests, from sea level to mountain elevations. Rattlesnakes are most active in warmer seasons, from spring to autumn. In southern latitudes they are occasionally found year-round.

Rattlesnake bite is a veterinary emergency.

It results in serious injury or even death to thousands of dogs each year. Rattlesnake venom is a complex mixture of toxins that spreads through a dog’s body following the bite. Red Rock Rattlesnake Vaccine was developed specifically to help defend dogs from the dangerous effects of rattlesnake venom. That’s rattlesnake protection that will put you and your dog at ease.

Dogs are at risk for rattlesnake bite.

They can encounter a rattlesnake anytime they are in rattlesnake habitat. You and your dog may live near rattlesnakes. You may travel through or frequently visit places where rattlesnakes are found. Perhaps rattlesnakes live where you take your dog hiking, camping or hunting. Like people, dogs may stumble upon a snake by accident. Curiosity or a protective instinct can place your dog at risk. Red Rock Rattlesnake Vaccine helps to protect her.

Damage caused by rattlesnake bite can be serious.

When injected into an unprotected dog, the toxins in snake venom are very painful and can have serious consequences. Even if your dog survives the immediate effects of a rattlesnake bite, he can be permanently injured by the venom.

Treatment of rattlesnake bite is expensive.

Treatment of snakebite may include antivenom injections that can cost hundreds to thousands of dollars. Use of antivenom is associated with an increased risk of adverse effects which can complicate a dog’s recovery. Other costs of snakebite treatment may include hospitalization, intravenous fluids, other medicines, and even surgery. Vaccination can reduce the impact of snakebite, reduce or eliminate the need for antivenom, and decrease other treatment costs.

The vaccine stimulates your dog’s own immunity.

Vaccines work by stimulating an animal’s immunity to defend against potentially harmful agents. The Rattlesnake Vaccine is intended to help create an immunity that will protect your dog against rattlesnake venom.

Snakebite is always an emergency.

Even after your dog is vaccinated against rattlesnake venom, she should be taken to a veterinarian for evaluation and care as soon as possible following snakebite. Veterinarians can determine whether your dog will require additional treatment. Even bites by non-venomous snakes can lead to serious infections and antibiotic treatment may be needed. A veterinarian is the best person to consult regarding medical decisions for your dog.

For more information:
http://www.redrockbiologics.com/rattlesnake_vaccine_for_dogs.php

Itching and Allergy in Dogs

Coping with an itchy pet can be an extremely frustrating experience for you, the pet owner, and can truly test the limits of the human-animal bond.  Persistent scratching and chewing by the pet can also result in self-excoriation and open wounds.  The following information is intended to provide the pet owner with a basic understanding of the most common underlying causes of itching and allergies in small animals.

The Most Common Causes of Chronic Itching

The common causes fall into two groups: external parasites and allergies.  External parasites that most commonly cause chronic itching dermatitis include fleas and sarcoptic mange.  We often recommend therapeutic trials for sarcoptic mange in chronically and severely itchy dogs.  We always recommend stepped-up flea control and monitoring for fleas, as flea infestation can really make allergy worse!

What are Allergies?

Allergy is a state of hypersensitivity in which exposure to a harmless substance known as an allergen induces the body’s immune system to “overreact.”  The incidence of allergies is increasing in both humans and their pets.  People with allergies usually have “hay fever” (watery eyes, runny nose and sneezing) or asthma. While dogs can rarely also have respiratory allergies, more commonly they experience the effects of allergic hypersensitivities as skin problems.  Though there are a variety of presentations, this can often be seen as redness and itching, recurring skin or ear infections, and hair loss.  This is sometimes called eczema or atopic dermatitis.

What are the Major Types of Allergies in Dogs?

Flea Allergy
Flea allergic dermatitis is the most common skin disease in dogs and cats.  For the flea allergic patient, 100% flea control is essential for the pet to remain symptom-free.

“But doctor, I never see fleas on my pet.”   You may not see them, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t there.  The allergy is caused by the flea’s saliva, and it only takes a few bites to induce the problem.  Also, the itchy pet often scratches so much that adult fleas are removed, making them hard to find.

“If fleas are the problem, why is my pet still itchy in the winter?”  In warm climates or in our homes, fleas may survive in low numbers year-round.  Because flea allergy is so common, we recommend that complete flea control be instituted before proceeding with diagnostics for other allergies and that year-round flea control be maintained for all allergy patients.

Food Allergy
Some pets develop specific hypersensitivities to components of their diets.  The allergen usually is a major protein or carbohydrate ingredient such as beef, chicken, pork, corn, wheat, or soy.  Minor ingredients such as preservatives or dyes are also potential allergens.  The diagnosis of food allergy requires that we test your pet by feeding special strict diets that contain only ingredients that he has never eaten before. This is often achieved by feeding a prescription diet for a period of 10 to 16 weeks.  If the signs resolve, a challenge is performed by feeding the former diet and watching for a return of the itching.  If this occurs, a diagnosis of food allergy is confirmed.

Atopic Dermatitis
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inherited predisposition to develop skin problems from exposure to variety of commonplace and otherwise harmless substances including the pollens of weeds, grasses and trees, as well as house dust mites and mold spores.  Diagnosis of AD is made based on the results of intradermal skin testing or by in vitro blood testing.  Evaluating the results of these tests helps us compile a list of allergens for a “vaccine” to decrease the pet’s sensitivity.  Sometimes multiple skin and/or blood tests are necessary to accurately assess the patient’s allergies.

Secondary Infections
Allergies are often the underlying cause of recurring skin and/or ear infections.  Bacterial and yeast infections, though secondary to the allergy, can cause an increase in your pet’s level of itching. Long-term treatment with antibiotics and anti-yeast medications is commonly required, along with medicated bathing programs.

Can Allergies be Cured?

Unfortunately, there is no cure for allergy and it is usually a life-long problem. We seek to control allergies and improve the quality of life for both you and your pet.  We will formulate the best program of management that suits all involved with your pet’s care.

Can I have the Itching Treated without the Expense of Diagnostic Testing?

Symptomatic drug therapy can help to reduce itching.  Steroids, such as prednisone tablets in particular, are often employed to stop the itch.  However, without addressing the underlying cause, the itching will return.  Long-term use of steroids can result in many health problems.  This is the reason that we encourage diagnosis of the underlying cause of the allergy and more specific or less potentially harmful treatments.

Date Published: 7/9/2007 10:29:00 AM
Date Reviewed/Revised: 07/09/2007

http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=2604&S=4&SourceID=61

Auburn, Local Vet, California, Veterinary Clinic, Dental, February, Vets in Auburn, CA, Puppy, Kitten, Exam, Surgery, Emergency,

New Flea & Tick Preventative ~ Vectra 3D

We switched over to Vectra as our recommended topical Flea and Tick preventative for dogs.

When, or if it ever starts raining the TICKS (yuk) will start to appear…so be prepared and pick some up the next time you’re here : )

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More Ticks Mean Year-Round Preventive Measures are a Must

In the span of less than a week, I found two ticks on my dog Harper, a Cavalier King Charles spaniel. In 25 years of dog ownership, that was a first. We live in Southern California, so ticks are a fact of life, but Harper doesn’t typically go into areas where ticks are found. We don’t have a yard, and she’s not allowed on local hiking trails. I can only surmise that the ticks hitched a ride on me — ick! — after a hike and made their way onto Harper.

Tick populations are increasing. And there aren’t just more of them; they’re being found in more places than in the past, says veterinary parasitologist Dr. Susan E. Little of Oklahoma State University. Milder winters; more white-tailed deer, which carry the tiny arachnids; and increasing development in formerly rural areas are among the factors in the ticks’ spread.

Like me, you might never have had to worry about ticks before, but now is a good time to talk to your veterinarian about their prevalence in your area. Many tick species have moved out of their original habitats, carried away by migratory birds, coyotes and deer. One or more species of ticks can now be found in every state, including Alaska and Hawaii. Ticks used to be active from spring through fall, but warmer winters mean that some species are staying active as late as February, depending on where they are located.

That’s bad news, since ticks are major carriers of diseases that affect humans, dogs, and cats. Most of us are familiar with Lyme disease, but ticks also transmit Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, babesiosis and Cytauxzoon felis, which infects cats. The ticks that primarily transmit these debilitating and sometimes deadly diseases are the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis), the Lone Star tick (Amblyomma americanum) and the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis).

Protect yourself and your pets from tick-borne diseases with the following measures:

  • Provide all your pets with lifetime parasite control. “We always say to treat every pet every month all year long,” Dr. Little says. Dogs and cats don’t spread tick-borne diseases directly to their owners, but they can acquire diseases from ticks as well as bring ticks into the home or yard. And just because your dog or cat stays mainly indoors or lives in a certain geographic region doesn’t mean he’s not at risk.
  • Ask your veterinarian which ticks and tick-borne diseases are common in your area and which product is best for protecting your animals. The information may have changed since you last learned about ticks.
  • Apply tick-prevention products on a regular schedule. It’s no longer effective to try to time parasite control to start in spring and stop after the second killing frost.
  • Check your dog or cat for ticks anytime he has been outdoors. Keep a tick-removal device on hand and know how to use it.
  • Make your yard less welcoming to ticks by removing leaf litter, mowing the lawn frequently, keeping landscaping free of tall grass and brush, and fencing your yard to prevent incursions by deer and other animals that carry ticks. A three-foot swathe of wood chips or gravel between your lawn and wooded areas won’t keep ticks away, but it does serve as a visual reminder that you are entering the tick zone.
  • Use insect repellent on yourself and wear protective clothing.
  • After a hike or other outdoor excursion to tick-friendly wooded areas with tall grass, give yourself a cursory examination for the little bloodsuckers, so you don’t drive them home to your pets. – by Kim Campbell Thornton

Links

Link to Pet Food Recall Products List (updated weekly)
http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/newpetfoodrecalls

Orthopedic Foundation for Animals
http:\\www.offa.org

American Kennel Club
http:\\www.akc.org

Cat Fanciers’ Association: International Registry of Pedigreed Cats
http://cfainc.org

Denver Humane Society… Good source for information on behavioral issues. Click on the education tab.
http:\\www.ddfl.org

Pet Adoption Help
http://www.petfinder.com

Remind my pet.com… Download App to your phone or receive reminder emails for almost anything.
http://remindmypet.com/